How to get rid of malware on Mac Pro

I have a Mac Pro with the OS X Yosemite. My computer has malware on it. I keep getting popups and ads on my screen, whether I'm using Safari or Chrome. One of the popups says "Suspicious activity found on your computer, due to pop-up advertisement windows and invasive links. Please contact tech support at 1-866-215-6348." I want to know how to get rid of this malware. Thanks in advance.

Some are persistent. Force quit Safari again. Disconnect from the Internet by either turning off Wi-Fi in the System Preferences, or unplugging the Ethernet cable from your router/modem. Hold the Shift key and launch Safari again. If the same popup appears, you will be able to dismiss it and navigate away from the page, or close its tab. Reconnect to the Internet.
Though reading your initial post again, it's sounding more like JimmyCMPIT is correct since you're seeing ads in multiple browsers. It's just rare for one the ads that pops up to be like one of the tech support scams.
In which case, you can either follow Apple's manual instructions for removing adware, or use the free automated tool, AdwareMedic (as mentioned by, and linked to by Jimmy).
It should be noted that Apple's manual removal instructions are typically outdated. Sometimes a lot outdated. It depends on when Apple last updated their instructions page. If you would prefer to manually remove the adware on your system, you can find much more up-to-date instructions on The Safe Mac's adware removal page.

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    ☞ A malware attacker could get control of a code-signing certificate under false pretenses, or could simply ignore the consequences of distributing codesigned malware.
    ☞ An App Store developer could find a way to bypass Apple's oversight, or the oversight could fail due to human error.
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    4. Starting with OS X 10.8.3, a third layer of protection has been added: a "Malware Removal Tool" (MRT). MRT runs automatically in the background when you update the OS. It checks for, and removes, malware that may have evaded the other protections via a Java exploit (see below.) MRT also runs when you install or update the Apple-supplied Java runtime (but not the Oracle runtime.) Like XProtect, MRT is effective against known threats, but not against unknown ones. It notifies you if it finds malware, but otherwise there's no user interface to MRT.
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    ☞ Software of any kind is distributed via BitTorrent, or Usenet, or on a website that also distributes pirated music or movies.
    ☞ Software with a corporate brand, such as Adobe Flash Player, doesn't come directly from the developer’s website. Do not trust an alert from any website to update Flash, or your browser, or any other software.
    ☞ Rogue websites such as Softonic and CNET Download distribute free applications that have been packaged in a superfluous "installer."
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    ☞ High-priced commercial software such as Photoshop is "cracked" or "free."
    ☞ An application helps you to infringe copyright, for instance by circumventing the copy protection on commercial software, or saving streamed media for reuse without permission.
    Conditional or unsolicited offers from strangers
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    ☞ A web site offers free content such as video or music, but to use it you must install a “codec,” “plug-in,” "player," "downloader," "extractor," or “certificate” that comes from that same site, or an unknown one.
    ☞ You win a prize in a contest you never entered.
    ☞ Someone on a message board such as this one is eager to help you, but only if you download an application of his choosing.
    ☞ A "FREE WI-FI !!!" network advertises itself in a public place such as an airport, but is not provided by the management.
    ☞ Anything online that you would expect to pay for is "free."
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    ☞ You open what you think is a document and get an alert that it's "an application downloaded from the Internet." Click Cancel and delete the file. Even if you don't get the alert, you should still delete any file that isn't what you expected it to be.
    ☞ An application does something you don't expect, such as asking for permission to access your contacts, your location, or the Internet for no obvious reason.
    ☞ Software is attached to email that you didn't request, even if it comes (or seems to come) from someone you trust.
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    6. Java on the Web (not to be confused with JavaScript, to which it's not related, despite the similarity of the names) is a weak point in the security of any system. Java is, among other things, a platform for running complex applications in a web page, on the client. That was always a bad idea, and Java's developers have proven themselves incapable of implementing it without also creating a portal for malware to enter. Past Java exploits are the closest thing there has ever been to a Windows-style virus affecting OS X. Merely loading a page with malicious Java content could be harmful.
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    ☞ To recognize malware, the software depends on a database of known threats, which is always at least a day out of date. This technique is a proven failure, as a major AV software vendor has admitted. Most attacks are "zero-day"—that is, previously unknown. Recognition-based AV does not defend against such attacks, and the enterprise IT industry is coming to the realization that traditional AV software is worthless.
    ☞ Its design is predicated on the nonexistent threat that malware may be injected at any time, anywhere in the file system. Malware is downloaded from the network; it doesn't materialize from nowhere. In order to meet that nonexistent threat, commercial AV software modifies or duplicates low-level functions of the operating system, which is a waste of resources and a common cause of instability, bugs, and poor performance.
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    ☞ Most importantly, a false sense of security is dangerous.
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    An AV app is not needed, and cannot be relied upon, for protection against OS X malware. It's useful, if at all, only for detecting Windows malware, and even for that use it's not really effective, because new Windows malware is emerging much faster than OS X malware.
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    I've got OSX/Genieo.A virus on my mac and don't know how to get rid of it and w I have it

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    Finally, be forewarned that when Genieo is mentioned on this site, the attacker sometimes shows up under the name "Genieo support." He will tell you to run a fake "uninstaller." As he intends, the uninstaller does not completely remove the malware, and is in fact malware itself.

  • Somehow i have got mackeeper and the smartsearchnet on mac air. I do not know how to get rid of it! please help me

    I have got mackeeper and smart search.net on my Mac air. I am new to mac's so i am so lost in how to get rid of things. Im not sure how i got it but i just want it gone now   mac book is only a couple months old so running all latest programmes on it. Can anyone help me please?

    You may have installed a variant of the "VSearch" ad-injection malware. Follow Apple Support's instructions to remove it.
    If you have trouble following those instructions, see below.
    Malware is always changing to get around the defenses against it. This procedure works as of now, as far as I know. It may not work in the future. Anyone finding this comment a few days or more after it was posted should look for a more recent discussion, or start a new one.
    The VSearch malware tries to hide itself by varying the names of the files it installs. To remove it, you must first identify the naming pattern.
    Triple-click the line below on this page to select it, then copy the text to the Clipboard by pressing the key combination  command-C:
    /Library/LaunchDaemons
    In the Finder, select
              Go ▹ Go to Folder...
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    If you find these files, leave the LaunchDaemons folder open, and open the following folder in the same way:
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    Open this folder:
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    Don't delete the "Application Support" folder or anything else inside it.
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    Don't delete the "Frameworks" folder or anything else inside it.
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  • How do i get rid of malware on my pc

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    Relaunch your browser in safe mode with extensions and plug-ins disabled, remove and disable any you find.
    Remove unwanted adware that displays pop-up ads and graphics on your Mac - Apple Support
    Download and run AdwareMedic
    http://www.adwaremedic.com/index.php
    http://www.thesafemac.com/mmg/
    Make sure your system is current
    Apple security updates - Apple Support
    The forum for MacBook Pro:
    MacBook Pro

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