Moving to a bigger HD on my MBPro

I am planning on upgrading the HED on my MBPro (OS X 10.5.8 and Parallels with XP). Runs great, just need a bigger drive. Unlike Windows, is there an easy way or do I have to re-install everything............
Thanks!

These basic steps work - thanks.
SuperDuper & Winclone are free - so that's nice.
The new version of SuperDuper doesn't have an option to expand - it just does it. And, "clone the existing hard drive" is now called "copy" - but it results in an exact copy that is bootable of the original and the whole new drive is available.
Winclone can backup & restore the boot camp partition to a network drive - no need to keep it on the desktop of the original disk. Winclone has to download some NTFS files before it will run. Make sure you are connected to the Internet when you run Winclone for the first time. Your best bet is to launch Winclone before you run SuperDuper - that way all of the NTFS support files will get copied to the new drive.
Winclone also lets you resize your NTFS "foot print" when you restore. When you use boot camp assistant to create a new partition, make it bigger or smaller - as you like. And then using the Winclone option to expand or shrink to fit the new boot camp partition.
This is a missing step: You have to re-partition the new drive before you can use it. Be careful while re-partitioning the replacement disk - there is an extra step that isn't obvious. Most disks seem to come from the store with a basic DOS / Windows partition. You have to select <Options...> from the "Disk Utilities" <Partition> menu to select the "Boot an OS-X computer" option; otherwise, "Boot Camp Assistant" will not let you re-partition the new drive.
This whole process took me about 5 hours. I used SuperDuper to clone to USB drive, and Winclone to a network drive. My original disk was 160GB: 50GB boot camp partition & a 90GB Mac partition. I moved to a 500GB drive = 50GB boot camp, 410 Mac.
I had to do this twice - because the replacement disk didn't have the "Boot Mac OS-X 10.5" option when I partitioned it.
The original HD is still bootable - put it in a USB enclosure and connect it to the computer - power up and hold the <option> key, and you can boot off the old disk. This saved me a lot of time when I had to do this the 2nd time.

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