Solid State Drive For Macbook Pro mid 2012

Hi Apple Users,
I would really appreciate some advice, a link would be great too.
I am using a mid 2012 macbook pro with 16gb ram. After trouble here and there, slowing down here and there to the point I'm about to crack - solution = Solid State Drive.
I use a variation of 2D & 3D Programs to design with which include photoshop, maya, modo and Mari. My laptop just can't cut it most of the time and I need whatever I can so I can get jobs done without any lag, freezing or spinning ball while my laptop tries to catch up.
I have browsed around for A solid State drive but what I found is confusing or at least I get somewhat lost in my search of plug and play. My built in hard Drive of 500gb has 350gb spare so going for a 250gb SSD seems the sensible option as I use my external HD to store my files, music etc.
I don't want to open my macbook and fiddle too much so any suggestions which are near enough 'plug and play' would be great. I am aware I will have to take the casing from my macbook but I want an SSD that -
- Fits straight into my macbook pro from out of the box
- I can use my time machine backup to put onto my new SSD without trouble and Can continue getting my design work done.
Budget wise I don't want to spend over £250 and that reminds me I would like to purchase from A uk website or retailer.
Please Point me in the right direction of what SSD to buy.
Really Appreciate your advice.
Thanks

Any SSD with a SATA formfactor of 2.5" diameter and a thickness of 9.5 mm will be compatible with your MBP.  Another possibility you might explore is OWC.
http://eshop.macsales.com/shop/internal_storage/SSD/Mercury_Electra_3G_Solid_Sta te
You may also may find this informative:
https://discussions.apple.com/docs/DOC-4741
SSDs are indeed expensive, but is is not my place, nor anyone else's, to tell you how to spend your money.  To dismiss your query by expressing personal bias is a disservice to you and the purpose of these forums.
I have installed in my MBP a Seagate SSHD (hybrid), 1 TB in capacity.  The cost is a very modest premium compared to a conventional HDD.  Boot and shutdown times are dramatically faster than before but it will not give the same performance as a SSD in processing resource intensive applications.  This is simply to give you an additional alternative to consider.
Ciao.

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